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Health Alert Updates

by Samish Public Health Services | Jul 19, 2018

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal – Salmonella Infections:

The CDC is recommending people do not eat any Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal because it has been linked to a multistate outbreak of Salmonella infections.  Kellogg’s voluntarily recalled Honey Smacks cereal back in June 2018.  Salmonella, a common food borne bacterial infection causes illness such as diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection.  The illness typically lasts 4 to 7 days and most individuals recover without treatment.  Children, Elders and those with weakened immune systems are most at risk for severe infections.  Salmonella is killed by thorough cooking and pasteurization.

According to the CDC:  “As of July 12, 2018, 100 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandka have been reported from 33 states.  A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page: https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/mbandaka-06-18/map.html.  Washington State is reporting three cases in King and Snohomish counties.  The CDC is advising consumers to contact their health care provider if they suspect they experienced illness as a result of eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.  The cereal should be discarded or returned to the store where it was purchased for a full refund.  Kellogg’s can be contacted at 1-800-962-1413 for more information. 

For more information on this recall: https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/Mbandaka-06-18/index.html.   CDC Salmonella homepage: https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/index.html.   U.S. FDA Recall Announcement:  https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm610815.htm

Multistate Outbreak of Cyclosporiasis:

The Food and Drug Administration and the CDC are currently investigating a multistate outbreak of Cyclospora parasitic infections which may be linked to McDonald’s salads.  The 61 confirmed cases reported thus far originate from McDonald locations in several Midwestern states.  There  have been 2 hospitalizations and no deaths.  Most individuals with healthy immune systems will recover without treatment.  Those in poor health with weakened immune systems may be at higher risk for severe or prolonged illness.  Individuals who develop diarrhea after eating McDonald’s salads are being asked to promptly see their healthcare provider to be tested for cyclophorias and treated appropriately.  McDonalds has voluntarily halted selling their salads at roughly 3,000 of their restaurants with locations in the Midwest. 

For more information about the multistate outbreak of Cyclosporiasis:  https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/s0716-mcdsalads.html.  CDC Cyclosporiasis homepage: https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/cyclosporiasis/

For more information about Food Safety, please visit:  https://www.foodsafety.gov/

Multi-Drug Resistant Salmonella Infections Linked to Raw Turkey Products:

Both the FDA and the CDC are investigating a multi-state and multidrug-resistant outbreak of Salmonella infections related to raw turkey products reported from 26 states.  40 people have been hospitalized.  No deaths have been reported.  As of July 11, 2018, no cases have been reported in Washington State.  However, Oregon is reporting one case and California is reporting six cases.

CDC’s Advice to Consumers:

Always handle raw turkey carefully and cook it thoroughly to prevent food poisoning.  Raw turkey products can have germs that spread around food preparation areas and can make you sick.  CDC advises consumers to follow these steps to help prevent Salmonella infection from raw turkey:

  • Wash your hands.  Salmonella infections can spread from one person to another.  Wash ands before and after preparing or eating food, after contact with animals, and after using the restroom or changing diapers.
  • Cook raw turkey thoroughly to kill harmful germs.  Turkey breasts, whole turkeys, and group poultry, including turkey burgers, casseroles, and sausage, would always be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F to kill harmful germs.  Leftovers should be reheated to 165 degrees F.  Use a food thermometer to check, and place it in the thickest part of the food. 
  • Don’t spread germs from raw turkey around food preparation areas.  Washington raw poultry before cooking is not recommended.  Germs in raw poultry juices can spread to other areas and foods.  Thoroughly wash hands, counters, cutting boards, and utensils with warm, soapy water after they touch raw turkey.  Use a separate cutting board from raw turkey and other raw meats if possible.

Please refer to the CDC’s Food Safety website for more information: https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/.